Irish Solstices

It seems crazy to think that it has been more than 6 months since I was last in Ireland. Since I never actually got my December post up, I figured this was a good opportunity to add some bits from those 5 days in Dublin with the fantastic hostess, Katie!

Strong first impressions remain:

  • Ireland in December is cold. Really cold. Although Dublin and London are fairly close, Dublin is MUCH more damp. Add a bit of winter wind and wowza. Come June, the frigid air was gone, but I was quite comfortable in jeans and a fleece. I survived December with a fleece and my dress jacket (which was more than enough in London), but I could have benefited from a wool sweater or two. The tool of survival: hot water bottles. (As they say in Ireland, ‘Tanks a million,’ Katie!!)
Freezing on the pier at Dun Laoghaire

Freezing on the pier at Dun Laoghaire

  • Since Ireland uses the euro, I thought things would be a smidge less expensive than London. When it comes to food, this is certainly NOT the case.  I don’t profess to have a great understanding of economics, but presumably this is because of importing costs. Porridge was a staple for breakfast (and lunch a few times, too) which made it possible to indulge in a full Irish breakfast.
  • Confession: I remember when I first moved here I kept getting geographically related politics (ie: Great Britain, United Kingdom, England, Ireland / Northern Ireland, Scottish Independence) very mixed up. Traveling and speaking with locals definitely provides new perspective. If you ever have a chance to travel to Dublin, I highly recommend making the Kilmainham Gaol one of your first stops in the city.
  • Biking (or “cycling” as they say) is very common in Dublin. The CocaCola Dublinbikes rental share works quite nice—5 euro for 3 days. The complication in the story, however, comes when you remember Irish Winter Solstice sunlight hours: fluorescent safety gear is near mandatory if you care to ride for more than your lunch hours. During rush hour, this form of transit is elevated to the “extreme” level during rush hour when you start weaving between moving vehicles. (Deep breaths, everyone, deep breaths!) When the traffic is slower, however, it makes for quick transit and a great way to see the lil city.
  • The coast is where it’s at. In December, this meant taking a short train from Dublin to Dun Laoghaire, and in June we visited the west coast. (Keep reading!)
  • Dublin is home to both Jameson & Guinness which seems fitting considering the active pub culture in Ireland. Having toured both the distillery (December) and the brewery factory (June), I can recommend both. Flying Ryanair limits one’s ability of bringing many souvenirs back, but my brother Franz received a teeny bottle of Writer’s Tears, an Irish Whiskey that I first spotted on Katie’s shelf.

For the June visit, I was joined by my friend Zoe, and together we stretched our wings a bit further. We took pit stops in Enis & Gallway…

…But the highlight of our three day jaunt across the island was our coastal walk from the Cliffs of Moher up to Doolin.

From what we could tell, most tourists just make it to the visitor’s center, marvel at the cliffs, and call it a day. On an overcast day, as are a number of days in Ireland, I can understand the desire to make this a short visit. We, however, scored a gloriously clear day and feasted our eyes not only on the “main attraction” (the Cliffs) but also the Aran Islands which are just off the coast. As I expressed previously and will continue to re-state, there is something very awe-inspiring about experiencing natural wonders.

Here’s to a summer of making even more of these memories!

Andrea

Featured Image: 4pm December sunset at Dun Laoghaire

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Three cheers for Spring!

If I was paid a nickel for every blog post that I intend to make, well… I would have a lot of nickels by now. But alas, life catches up, and I seem to have far more words floating in my head than I can manage to fit on paper in 24 hours each day. Here’s a tribute to the highlights of Spring 2015!

 

Stonehenge on the Equinox

Cici and Andrea Stonehenge

 

In case you missed that post, check it out here.

Isle of Man

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See Ben’s post here for more pictures & the rest of the story.

 

Lake District

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And see his post here about the “walking” (British word for hiking) in Lake District.

 

Adventures in Scotland

from Glasgow to Edinburgh with Gretchen & Joan

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Theatre bingeing

My love of theatre and the performing arts was treated quite well when I lived in A2, and it has only grown since moving to London. I was probably averaging about 1 show every 6 weeks… until I introduced Gretch & Joan to the West End. After a thrilling night with front row seats to Memphis, we decided that the 2nd of their two day visit to London should be spent going to a matinee (Billy Elliot) and an evening performance (Agatha Christie’s Mousetrap).  Gotta make the most of those London minutes!!

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As a student, I have the pleasure of tapping into the crazy-cheap student tickets with my last my last 6 shows ranging from £0 to£5 each. Just as golfing in Jackson, MI can be cheaper than going to the movie theater, scoring student tickets for the West End can be less expensive than meeting up at the pub. The more that I indulge however, the less I am able to shut my mind off and enjoy the show.   (Well… let’s be real. I don’t think I was ever the type to just shut my mind off.) I described part of this when I spoke of Matilda.  And I think it has become even more noticeable as I indulge. Consider, for example, the Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night. (The Spark Notes summary is here if you haven’t seen the show or read the book.) While the 12 year old girls sitting next to me were trying to solve the mystery during intermission and gushing over how “Christopher is so good at Maths*!!” after the final curtain call, my mind had drifted down some other paths.

 

  • How do we as a society treat people who fall outside of “normal”? From an early age, we learn to be tolerant of people that are different from us. This earns us the badge of being civil. What is the difference between being tolerant and being kind?
  • What responsibilities do parents have to their children? Do these responsibilities depend on the child’s individual needs and talents? I was particularly interested in the contrast between Christopher’s mother and father. The father stayed with him the whole time, but there were some obvious parent / child clashes made more frustrating by misunderstanding Christopher’s autism. The mother—overwhelmed by having an autistic child—copes by having an affair and moving away with the new man, but continues to express her never-ending love for Christopher through letters.

[*Brits say Maths instead of Math. This still hasn’t stopped bringing a smile to my face. 🙂 ]

If I ever become bored, I think I shall develop a lecture series about Social Science, Health, and Medicine in the West End.

 

…And reliving the excitement of seeing London for the first time through the eyes of visitors

Featured Image: from the Columbia Road Flower Market

Catholic Approaches to Bioethics – Discussion on June 22 at 3:30PM

A taste on what I am up to when I’m not working on my dissertation or off adventuring… 🙂

Department of Global Health & Social Medicine at King's College, London

The “Religion & Bioethics” reading group is reconvening to discuss ‘Catholic Approaches to Bioethics’ on Monday June 22nd 330 pm – 5 pm (PLEASE NOTE UNUSUAL TIME), in room 3.1.1 East Wing, King’s Building, Strand Campus.

 Andrea Berkemeier (Bioethics & Society MA student) has kindly volunteered to share with us her knowledge of Catholic approaches toBioethics and will open the discussion. Take a look at Andrea’s blog here.

You can access the reading list here.

Hope to see many of you there! For inquiries, silvia.1.camporesi@kcl.ac.uk

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